FAQ

What Shoes Were Popular in the 90s?

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A look at the most popular shoes of the 90s, including the Air Jordan, Nike Air Max, and Reebok Pump.

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Platform shoes

The platform shoe is a type of footwear with a very thick sole, often in the range of 10-20 cm (4-8 inches). They became fashionable in Europe during the Middle Ages, and remained popular into the Renaissance. In the early 1990s, platform shoes made a comeback in fashion, especially in the form of flatforms and clogs. The style reemerged again in late 2010s as sneakers with a thick sole.

Mary Jane shoes

Mary Jane shoes were popular in the 1990s and continue to be a fashion staple today. These shoes typically feature a round toe, low heel, and are fastened with a strap across the foot. Mary Jane shoes can be dressy or casual, depending on the style and material.

Doc Martens

Doc Martens were a popular shoe in the 1990s, especially among those in the punk and grunge scenes. The sturdy boots were originally designed for workers in factories and mines, but they quickly gained popularity as a fashion statement. Doc Martens are still popular today, and they continue to be associated with counterculture movements.

Chunky heels

Chunky heels were a popular style of shoe in the 1990s. The chunky heel is a thick, blocky heel that is square or rectangular in shape. This style of heel is wider than a stiletto heel and provides more stability. Chunky heels can be found on a variety of shoe styles, including pumps, sandals, and boots.

Slip-on sneakers

Slip-on sneakers were very popular in the 1990s. They were typically made of canvas or other fabric and had a rubber sole. Some popular brands of slip-on sneakers in the 1990s were Vans and Keds.

Flatforms

While there were many different types of shoes popular in the 1990s, one style that remains firmly entrenched in ’90s fashion is the flatform. Flatforms are shoes with a thick, wide sole that typically provides extra height to the wearer. While they can be found in a variety of styles, they are most commonly associated with sandals and sneakers.

Flatforms first gained popularity in the late 1980s, but they reached their peak in the mid-1990s. At this time, flatforms were often seen as a more affordable alternative to real designer shoes. However, they soon became popular among celebrities and fashionistas alike.

If you’re looking to add a touch of ’90s style to your wardrobe, consider investing in a pair of flatforms. Whether you choose sandals, sneakers, or another type of shoe, you’re sure to make a statement!

Knee-high boots

Knee-high boots were trotted out in the early ‘90s by none other than the fashionista herself, Madonna. You can find these boots made of just about any material these days, but back then, they were typically made of a thinner leather and often came in patent leather. They also had a lower, chunky heel as opposed to the stiletto heel that is often seen on knee-high boots today.

Thigh-high boots

In the 1990s, thigh-high boots were all the rage. These sexy and stylish boots elongated the leg, making the wearer look tall and slim. They were often paired with mini skirts or shorts, and were a staple of the popular Spice Girls fashion style. Though they fell out of fashion in the early 2000s, thigh-high boots are making a comeback in recent years.

Ugg boots

Ugg boots were first popularized in the United States by surfers and other beach-goers who appreciated the boots’ ability to keep feet warm and dry. The Ugg boot trend spread to the mainstream in the late 1990s, when celebrities like Jennifer Lopez and Pamela Anderson began wearing them. Ugg boots remain a popular style of footwear today, especially in colder climates.

Doc Martens

One of the most popular shoes in the 90s was the Doc Marten. These chunky, black boots were worn by everyone from grunge rockers to preppies, and they became a symbol of defiance and individualism. Other popular shoes in the 90s included sneakers like Reeboks and Nikes, as well as platform shoes and Mary Janes.

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Jacky Chou

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